Various; Stavert J. Cash, Howard K. Elcock, C. E. Brock and others

In the books thrown out by my parents-in-law, I retrieved these pages. The book had no credits, but a couple of names are legible and I’ll leave you with the rest.

Miscellaneous 1

C.E.Brock

Miscellaneous 2

C.E.Brock 2

As Wikipedia says: Charles Edmund Brock (5 February 1870 – 28 February 1938) was a widely published English line artist and book illustrator, who signed his work C. E. Brock

Stavert J Cash

Stavert J Cash

I couldn’t find much to help identify Stavert J Cash except a reference on a genealogical website stating he could be Stavert Johnstone Cash (1884-). One interesting find was a Boy’s Own Paper from 1914 which ‘predicted’ the mobile phone:

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Stavert J Cash Marconigraph

Stavert J Cash A Vision of the future. The Pocket Marconigraph. Tapping off a Message for Help

 

 

Howard Elcock

Howard Elcock

Miscellaneous 3

Miscellaneous 3

Miscellaneous 4

Miscellaneous 4 but could be Elcock?

Howard K. Elcock was most famous for his association with the drawings for Sherlock Holmes in the Strand Magazine

Miscellaneous 5

Miscellaneous 5

Miscellaneous 6

Miscellaneous 6

The signature on this piece is totally unknown to me, but is it ‘N. Sotheby Paberton’ or similar?

Signature

What's the artist's name?

The legend of St Piano by Georges Montbard

This time round something a bit more unusual. I can’t remember how I came by this but suspect it was one of those old damp tomes from my Mother and Father-in-Law that was about to be thrown away and I wanted to rescue a few illustrations. So here they are for you.

I’m sorry but I don’t know where this was published (was it Home Notes?) but Montbard has books in print still despite writing in the turn of the 1800s-1900s in such magazines as The Windsor Magazine and Pearson’s Magazine (US). Apparently Georges Montbard was a pen name for author Charles Auguste Loyes.

You can read the whole of Among the Moors: Sketches of Oriental Life by Georges Montbard – Published 1894 by Sampson Low, Marston & Company. It comes in many e-formats and contains several illustrations.

But here is the Legend of St Piano….

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Page 1

Page 2

Page 2

Page 3

Page 3

Page 4

Page 4

Page 5

Page 5

Home Notes: Leslie Caswell

I mentioned Leslie Caswell, whom Mike Noble (the comic artist) knew in the 50s in the last blog post.

Noble is quoted as saying “Caswell showed me how to design a picture within a frame” (Boyd, N. in Khoury, G. ed. 2004, p.152*).

The Net includes reference to his school background (Soham Grammar School). This is a really fascinating period piece and we learn that Caswell exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1940 and was in Burma during the war in the Royal Artillery.

Leslie Caswell at Soham

Leslie Caswell at Soham 1937 - 2nd from left on back row - (shamelessly borrowed from: http://www.sohamgrammar.org.uk/midsum_1937.htm)

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My first scan from Home Notes shows a couple with the man almost looking comical! I’m not sure if my wife dressed like that I would be worrying about her ‘tidiness’.

Home Notes 27 July 1951 p6-7

Home Notes 27 July 1951 p6-7

Unfortunately I no longer have this issue to be able to tell you what ‘Linda’ did! But remember this is the early 50s. The affluent growing middle class after the Second World War is definitely the only model of family allowed at this time. Father is the sturdy solid black figure in the foreground towering in proportions over his wife and child. The lighting is interesting in this. The window is ‘in our faces’ but still is balanced by the dark suit

Home Notes 17 August 1951 p28-29

Home Notes 17 August 1951 p28-29

Again here we have the coy wife and her protector. A 1951 ideal.Notice however the strong figure work. He is looking to the right to her, and we follow his eyes to her and wonder then what she is thinking.

Home Notes 7 September 1951 p7

Home Notes 7 September 1951 p7

There is scant reference to Caswell on the Net, but interestingly:

Textbook of Operative Gynæcology

By Wilfred Shaw, M.A., M.D., F.R.C.S., Gynæcologist, St. Andrew’s Hospital, Dollis Hill, London, England. Cloth. $19. Pp. 444, with 382 illustrations. Williams & Wilkins Company, Mt. Royal and Guilford Aves., Baltimore 2; E. & S. Livingstone, Ltd., 16 and 17 Teviot Pl., Edinburgh, Scotland, 1954.

This is one of the foremost books on operative gynecology published in any language. It is a pity that Wilfred Shaw did not live to see this book completed. Even though he knew he had a fatal illness, he worked on the manuscript to the very end. Shaw acknowledged inspiration of illustrations from the textbooks of Peham-Amreich, Martius, TeLinde, and Greenhill. He borrowed some excellent original drawings, but the remainder of the illustrations were drawn by Leslie Caswell and are unsurpassed for accuracy and beauty.

Lastly for some of Caswell’s colour work take a look at “The spear thrower” from 1972, an unusual piece to be doing later in life!

So where did he continue illustrating when he moved to Cornwall and is he still alive? Get in touch if you know more
* Boyd, Norman, 2004. in G. Khoury, ed. True Brit: a celebration of the great comic book artists of the UK?, pp.150-155

Home Notes: Fred Laurent

Fred Laurent is another artist who is lost to the Internet “Fred Laurent was born in Brussels in 1922 and trained as an artist, but at the start of WW2 he fled Belgium for England. After service in the British army as a commando, he became a well established illustrator, principally for women’s magazines and romantic book covers.” This line appears all over the place. He doesn’t appear in the usual art dictionaries. Another site states he was born in 1922 which sounds reasonable but where did they get the info? Other artists in Home Notes included the famous Frank Bellamy, Leslie Caswell and Philip Townsend and as can be seen they are more or less talking heads, so not very exciting for the artist.

Home Notes 1951 Feb 16 p15

Fred Laurent in Home Notes 1951 Feb 16 p15

However I feel that Laurent particularly makes a great job of his talking heads.In the shot above, the shine to the picture almost looks like a Mike Noble picture and his ‘master’ Leslie Caswell did work for the same studio run by ‘Billy’ Cooper

Home Notes 1951 July 13 p27

Home Notes 1951 July 13 p27

In this illustration, we get a third figure and some background. The printing in these magazines didn’t help make them too clear, but Laurent’s style shines through.

Home Notes 1951 July 27 p29

Home Notes 1951 July 27 p29

In this clincher, the lighting is very interesting.

Home Notes 1951 July 20 p27

Home Notes 1951 July 20 p27

I love the sureness of the couple in this picture, together with the perspective of the bench. It shows an artist who is in command of his trade. I imagine – and have absolutely no proof – that he didn’t use models. But on a weekly deadline, I expect he would have had to

Home Notes 1951 September 7 p15

Home Notes 1951 September 7 p15

Take a moment to look at the light source in this last picture. My father used Brylcreem on his wild hair and that produced a sheen wherever he was, but the lady?

Fred Laurent did  a lot of colour work in John Bull at the same time, Due to the crude cataloguing the very useful Advertising Archives results include too many Laurents click here but you’ll have to wade through the other famous Yves St Laurent (any relations?)

Back next week with some more Home Notes