Margaret Tarrant and The Littlest One

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Recently I bought a book for my wife but have no idea where now! Still I wanted to share the details in case anyone was interested.

We have both loved Cecily Mary Barker  since we were kids (no we didn’t know each other at that time!) but when we first got married we had posters on our walls and later bought two Margaret Tarrant pictures! I always thought of her artwork as ‘insubstantial’ yet cute. But the two we bought still inspire me when I look at them. They are both at the top of this post and the reproduction does not do them justice.

Anyway enough of my memories.

The Littlest One was written by Marion St John Webb and you can read more about the authoress on the wonderful March House Books website. I found I had bought the third one in the series “The Littlest One Again” first published in 1923, so I’d bought a very cheap first edition! But it was the pictures which grabbed me. Here they are.

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Norman Thelwell

My wife and I visited Hampshire recently in order to see the Norman Thelwell exhibition (16 January to 10 April 2016, 11am – 5pm)at the National Trust property, Mottisfont House. I was really pleased to see that the captions, which were excellent, stated that all the artwork on display was “On loan from the Thelwell Family Archive”. I hope they won’t mind me sharing these crude photographs all taken by me, and thus including reflections!

It was wonderful to walk round a few rooms and find older people than me laughing out loud. The cartoons still work so well and as one caption stated:

“In some ways Thelwell was out of step with conventions for cartoons in post-war Britain – these were often political and urban in outlook and acerbic in tone. […] Thelwell’s approach was completely different. His style was always naturalistic  and he included a great deal of descriptive detail. […] Although he said that politics bored him, Thelwell did produce cartoons that used humour to protest against environmental issues.”

 

The following are borrowed from the Mottisfont website (All Thelwell material is © The Estate of Norman Thelwell, and the official website has great stuff that I have no need to reproduce here!):

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Romsey Abbey

Romsey Abbey by Norman Thelwell

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Daily Mirror 24 May 1961 found under the carpet!

We’ve had the plasterer in our house for a few weeks and wish we’d moved out. If we had we wouldn’t have seen this issue of the Daily Mirror which was found under our dining room carpet (or more accurately the underlay!). Please forgive the poor nature of the photos, taken with my phone. The colour of the paper is pretty accurate here! The paper was very grimy and I was sad that we didn’t have a full copy of  the Perishers strip in this find!

Wednesday 24 May 1961

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Andy Capp in Daily Mirror 1961 May 24

 

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Sooty in Daily Mirror 1961 May 24

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Franklin cartoon re RAB Butler and Franco

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Keeping up with the Joneses – John Burns art? in Daily Mirror 1961 May 24

 

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Buck Ryan, The Larks, Garth, The Flutters and the Perishers and ? in Daily Mirror 1961 May 24

 

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Ron Embleton in The Crackerjack Western Book published by The Children’s Press

I found these on the web recently and thought them worth posting. I believe the given date of 1959 as the British Library’s copy (if the same book) states [1960], but these things are hard to date. They are by Ron Embleton, an artist I saw a lot when growing up in the late fifties, sixties and seventies. His work appeared in many of the comics of my youth such as ‘Stingray’ in TV21, and many illustrations of historical subjects in Look & Learn. Even my Mother and Father-in-Law had one of his “Victorian sellers” pictures, or was is “Victorian children’s games”? You can buy lots of his original artwork from the nice people at Illustration Art Gallery.

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Roger Hall’s cover to the 1959(?) Crackerjack Western Book

"Express Delivery" illustrated by Ron Embleton

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